Welcome to Ace Breeders!  We raise champion quality Australian Terriers.  We fell in love with this breed and hope you do too!  

If you are looking for a bright, keen little dog full of affection then you have come to the right place.  Australian Terriers are hardy, loyal, agile, and bold.  But don't be mistaken, they are quiet and loving as well.  Aussies make an even tempered playmate for children.   Perfect for indoors, they have a non-shedding, hypo-allergenic haircoat.  They are adaptable and love city life as much as the farm.  


We are commited to being responsible breeders.  Careful consideration goes into each pairing.  We want to breed the best dogs possible and find them the best home too.  We welcome visitors at any time to meet the breed and us as well.  We stand behind our dogs and want to hear all about their forever homes.

We strive to give our puppies the best start in life.  The puppies live in the kitchen and are socialized with other dogs, people, household noises, and children.  They are all CKC registered, microchipped, have their first vaccinations, and have been examined by a vet.  Pups never leave our home until they are at least 8 weeks of age.  By this time they are ready to take on the world, or at least enjoy their new home.

There are three major criteria that I use for determining which dogs should or should not be bred.  Temperment, conformation, and health.  No one is more important that the next.  They all play a key role in each puppy.  This is the model in which my breeding program is founded on.


The Grand Little Dog
By Leslie Hoy and Julie Seaton - from ShowSight January 2013


Imagine yourself at a dog show, watching as the Terrier group enters the ring. A little prick eared dog- one of the smallest of the group and with a lively expression - catches your eye. What's that? It's not a Cairn, too big for a Norwich… A glance at the catalog tells you it's an Australian Terrier, a breed you may never have heard of, and a breed that's a great little secret!

Origins and History

Like many breeds, the Aussie's exact origins are somewhat obscure. It is known that early British settlers to Tasmania, a harsh and often unfriendly country, needed fearless dogs to control rodents and snakes, guard the gold mines, and look after the flocks on the large sheep stations, as well as be companion dogs for them and their families. A native dog of Australian, the Rough-Coated Terrier, is believes to have been cross-bred with the settlers' dogs, which included small Terriers that came along from various parts of Great Britain. What most breed historians do seem to agree upon is that Dandy Dinmont, Skye, and Black and Tan Terriers are all part of the Australian Terrier's makeup. From this combination, we get the distinctive Aussie "topknot," the harsh weather proof coat, and the colours of sandy, re, and blue/tan. Their heritage also gives them their distinctive silhouette - proportionately longer than tall, with upright ears. Their diminutive size, about 10-11 inches at the withers and about 14- 18 pounds when fully grown, makes them an ideal size for people who want a big dog in a small package.

The Aussie has the distinction of being the first Australian breed to be recognized and shown in its country of origin, as well as being the first breed from that country to ne accepted int o the registries of other nations. Initially exhibited as the Broken-Coated Terrier in 1868 in Melbourne, Australia, the name was changed to the Australian Terrier in the very late 1800's. Several were brought to England at about the same time. They also became popular in India with British official stationed there, and were exhibited in Indian dog shows during the 1910s and 1920s. Officially recognized in England be the British Kennel Club in 1933, the first cane to America in the late 1940s, but it took some time for them to be recognized and shown in AKC events.

Nine of them were entered in Westminster under the "Miscellaneous" class in 1958, but two years later, in 1960, the entry jumped to 58. That was also the year in which they were admitted to the AKC's registry. Along with this was the distinction of being the first new Terrier reed to be admitted to the AKC in over 20 years. Mush of the is the legacy of the late Nell Fox of Pleasantpastures Kennels. She was a New Zealand native who grew to love he Aussie and advocated tirelessly for its acceptance into the AKC and to uphold and refine the breed standard in the United States. Our affiliate breed club, the Australian Terrier Club of America, became an AKC member club in 1977 and now some 150 members strong.

Choosing an Australian Terrier

If you are thinking about getting an Australian Terrier, it's important to keep in mind the heritage and history of the breed. The Australian Terrier has a strong working background and beds a job to do. Their instinct is to chase down and kill rodents and snakes. They are brine to dog, going to ground if needed to catch their prey. If your property has landscaping or formal gardening, an Aussie on the hunt may do some gardening of its own if left unsupervised. And if a mole or chipmunk makes its presence known, look out! They take their job as pest controllers very seriously. No chipmunk, squirrel, rabbit, or snake is safe when they're on patrol! Terriers in general often have a reputation for being 'stubborn,' but this isn't entirely fair. A dog that is bred to go to ground needs a great deal of confidence and independence from its owner to to that work, which can be misconstrued as willfulness.

As well, they have historically been companion animals and do best in close proximity to their families. Their rough coat will protect them from the elements, but this is not a dog suited to live outside or spend too much time alone in a crate or kennel run. Likewise, they must never be allowed to roam unsupervised, as their prey drive is strong and they could easily be hit by a car, so a fenced yard is best. they are alert watch dogs and will let their owners know if anyone or anything is too close for their liking, although in general, they do not bark just to make noise and are much quieter than other small breeds. As with other terriers, they can be somewhat bossy and will want to rule the roost in your home, so some consideration must be given if you have other dogs in your household.

On the plus side, Aussies have a real affinity for children and the elderly, and are unswervingly devoted to their homes and families. They need regular exercise, but not a lot, and daily walks and playing with a ball or toy will suffice. Because they are not very well known, they have not been overbred and are less prone to genetic ailments than other, more popular breeds. Typically they live well into their teens with few problems. Coat care is easily achieved with regular brushing and combing to pull out the dead hair and only occasional baths, as too much bathing can dry out the coat and skin. A high-quality food is of course the best. They are adaptable and quite comfortable in country of city life and all stops in between, and are generally easy keepers who want nothing more than to be at the heart of your home.

Things to do with your Australian Terrier

Because of their lively and intelligent nature, the Australian Terrier can be found participating enthusiastically in a number of performance events. Agility, obedience, freestyle ("dancing with dogs"), earthdog, flyable, and tracking are just a few of the many canine sports in which the Aussie can and does shine. It is important to start a young one off right by going to puppy kindergarten class and then continuing on with manners and basic obedience. Aussies want to please their people and learn easily, but become bored with repetitions. Vary the skills you train and the activities you do, keep your sessions short and get them to want more, and you'll always have their attention!

Their innate understanding of people also makes Aussies a great choice as pet therapy dogs. They will happily cuddle up to someone who is ill, plus their small size makes them more approachable to people who have balance or gait problems or who are not regularly around dogs. The Aussie will happily curl up at the side of someone who is ill or bedridden, whether a stranger or you, and warm you with their loving presence.

But now let's go back for a moment to that show ring. The dogs circle the ring and finally it's the Aussie's turn to be examined. Once off the table and on the down and back, this lively little fellow stops walking and starts strutting! Back in the lineup, he happily 'boings' straight up, as high as his handler's waist, while waiting to go around the ring again. Whether or not he wins, he's happy and she shows it in every endeavour he participates in.

But why do they jump vertically like that? Some breeders think it's part of their working heritage. According to one breeder from Australia, the dogs have just one chance to kill a snail and to do that, they need to be as far off the ground as possible to land on top of it and avoid the snake striking back. They have carried that trait through the generations. Even now, when there are no snakes around, they still sail into the air for not reason other than they can!

So welcome to the world of Australian Terriers! You are one oft he lucky ones if you are part of it, but if not, give them a try! They're devoted companions who celebrate with you hen you are happy, console you when you're sad, and make you laugh every day. They're a mix of sage and clown, buttoned down and all business whine it's time to get serious, but the life of the party when the work's done and it's time to play. Get to know these lively little boys and girls and enrich your life.